Alternative explanations of the trade-output correlation in the East Asian economies
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Alternative explanations of the trade-output correlation in the East Asian economies

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Published by OECD in Paris .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • East Asia

Subjects:

  • Exports -- East Asia -- Econometric models.,
  • Investments -- East Asia -- Econometric models.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Colin I. Bradford Jr. and Naomi Chakwin.
SeriesTechnical papers ;, no. 87, Technical papers (Organisation for Economic co-operation and Development. Development Centre) ;, no. 87.
ContributionsChakwin, Naomi., Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD72 .T43 no. 87
The Physical Object
Pagination32 p. ;
Number of Pages32
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL844653M
LC Control Number95122840
OCLC/WorldCa29664625

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Get this from a library! Alternative Explanations of the Trade-Output Correlation in the East Asian Economies. [Colin Bradford Jr; Naomi Chakwin]. Colin Bradford & Naomi Chakwin, "Alternative Explanations of the Trade-Output Correlation in the East Asian Economies," OECD Development Centre Working Pap OECD Publishing. Jeffrey A. Frankel & David Romer, "Trade and Growth: An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers , National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. Using nine alternative indicators of trade orientation I find out that the data supports the view that more open economies tend to grow faster than economies with trade distortions. APEC: International trade and output. economies of scale, and various labor training and ‘demonstration’ effects. Alternative Explanations of the Trade-Output Correlation in the East Author: Yutaka Kurihara.

Over the last couple of centuries the world economy has experienced sustained positive economic growth, and over the same period, this process of economic growth has been accompanied by even faster growth in global trade.. In a similar way, if we look at country-level data from the last half century we find that there is also a correlation between economic growth and trade: . From Trade-Driven Growth to Growth-Driven Trade: Reappraising the East Asian Development Experience. Paris: Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Bradford Jr., Colin and Naomi Chakwin. "Alternative Explanation of the Trade-Output Correlation in the East Asian Economies". OECD Development Centre Technical Papers No. Numerous studies have shown that one of the major differences between the success stories of East Asia and the experiences of Latin America has been that East Asian economies have made the transition to knowledge generation, whereas Latin America is still lagging behind in this respect – and, indeed, substantially so (Cimoli and Porcile, Working Paper No. 87, Alternative Explanations of the Trade-Output Correlation in the East Asian Economies, by Colin I. Bradford Jr. and Naomi Chakwin, August Document de travail No. 88, La Faisabilité politique de l’ajustement dans les pays africains, par Christian Morrisson, Jean-Dominique Lafay et Sébastien Dessus, novembre

Laura Alfaro is the Warren Alpert Professor of Business Administration. At Harvard Business School since , she is also a Faculty Research Associate in the National Bureau of Economic Research's International Finance and Macroeconomics Program and the International Trade and Investment Program, member of the International Finance Corporation (IFC) Economic . Abstract. This thesis begins by confirming Ireland's status as a 'tiger' economy when measured against internationally recognised benchmarks. Wholly unanticipated, yet generating the most remarkable economic transformation in the history of the state, the underlying causes of the accidental 'Celtic Tiger' remain problematical.;Evidence is presented which suggested that two Author: Bryan. Fields. The argument for shifting from an inward-oriented to an outward- oriented strategy was greatly strengthened by the success of a small group of "newly industrializing economies" and particularly of the four East Asian economies in this group: Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan. 1 These four "superexporters" have followed a. Throughout the s, the social-market capitalism that prevailed in most of the larger countries of continental Western Europe and the producer-oriented or mercantilist capitalism characteristic of Japan and a number of other large Asian economies were under strong pressures to migrate their economies toward U.S. (or Anglo-Saxon)-style.